Further reading on epistemic oppression

If you’d like to do a deep dive into some of our esteemed guest’s writings on epistemic oppression, here are links to some of her papers on the topic: ‘Conceptualizing Epistemic Oppression,’ Kristie Dotson ‘A Cautionary Tale: On Limiting Epistemic Oppression,’ Kristie Dotson ‘Tracking Epistemic Violence, Tracking Practices of Silencing,’ Kristie Dotson Happy reading! Matt Teichman...

Episode 92: Kristie Dotson discusses epistemic oppression

Subscribe to Elucidations:         Note: this episode was recorded in 2016, prior to the US presidential election. Kristie Dotson will be coming back in a future episode to give us her latest thoughts on these topics in light of recent developments in US politics! Full transcript here. This month, we talk to Kristie Dotson (Michigan State University) about how people’s ability to gather and share information can be negatively impacted under oppressive social systems....

Further reading on counterfactuals

Hello, everyone! Hope you’re enjoying the new year. If you enjoyed our episode on counterfactuals and would like to learn more about Paolo Santorio’s causal network theory, check out the following paper: ‘Interventions in Premise Semantics,’ Paolo Santorio For a broader overview of casual network approaches to counterfactuals, the following paper by R.A. Briggs is a wonderful start: ‘Interventionist Counterfactuals,’ R.A. Briggs Happy reading! Matt...

Episode 91: Paolo Santorio discusses counterfactuals

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we talk to Paolo Santorio about counterfactuals, also known as statements of the form ‘If A were, then B would be.’ Click here to listen to our conversation. Counterfactual statements, those funny conditional statements where the word ‘would’ comes after the word ‘then,’ play an absolutely central rule both in everyday commonsense reasoning and in our more formal scientific theorizing....

Episode 90: Ásta Sveinsdóttir discusses social construction

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we talk to Ásta Sveinsdóttir (San Francisco State University) about social-institutional entities, like money, the economy, political borders, nation states, and, interestingly, categories of people. Click here to listen to our conversation. For a while now, philosophers have been interested in the status of things like money. A $5 bill has the purchasing power it has not because of any intrinsic features that belong to the paper it’s printed on, but because we all agree to treat it as having that purchasing power....

Further reading on language universals

For a further taste of our guest’s thoughts on the theory of universal grammar, the following dialogue is an incredibly fun read: ‘Language: a Dialogue,’ John Collins I also heartily recommend that you visit his website and his academia.edu page, where he’s got lots of great papers on some of the most central issues in the philosophy of language and foundations of linguistics. Happy reading! Matt Teichman...

Episode 89: John Collins discusses language universals

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This time, we have the privilege of talking to John Collins (University of East Anglia) as we shift our attention to the human language faculty. Click here to listen to our conversation. Human beings are the only animal in the world that can natively acquire a language like English, French, Czech, Nahuatl, Yoruba, or Tamil....

Further reading on snap judgments

For those who are interested in following up on our previous episode, you can take a look at Section 5 of the following paper: ‘Knowledge In and Out of Context‘ The following papers by our guest are also a really great read! ‘Default Reasoning: Jumping to Conclusions and Knowing When to Think Twice’ ‘A Rationale for Reliabilism‘ Happy reading! Matt Teichman...

Episode 88: Kent Bach discusses jumping to conclusions

Subscribe to Elucidations:         Episode transcript here. This month, we talk to Kent Bach (San Francisco State University) about his picture of how beliefs relate to particular thoughts. Click here to listen to our conversation. In this episode, Kent Bach discusses two of his big ideas at the border between the philosophy of mind and epistemology....

Further reading on perceptual particularity

If you’re in the mood to do a deep dive and learn more about the view that Susanna Schellenberg shared with us during the previous episode, she suggests taking a look at the following papers of hers: ‘Perceptual Particularity’ ‘Phenomenal Evidence and Factive Evidence’ ‘Experience and Evidence’ ‘Belief and Desire in Imagination and Immersion’ ‘Perceptual Content Defended’ ‘Ontological Minimalism About Phenomenology‘ Enjoy! Matt Teichman...

Episode 87: Susanna Schellenberg discusses perceptual particularity

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we sit down with Susanna Schellenberg to talk about what ordinary perception does and doesn’t have in common with hallucination. Click here to listen to our conversation. When you picture to yourself how vision works, you probably imagine something along the following lines. There’s some light which gets projected into your eyes, and the light stimulates the rod and cone cells in your retina....

Further reading on photographs

For those of you who would like to follow up on our discussion with Daniel Smyth, he recommends the following papers: ‘Snapshots, Perception, and Intimacy,’ Daniel Smyth ‘Photography, Vision, and Representation,’ Joel Snyder and Neil Walsh Allen ‘Picturing Vision,’ Joel Snyder ‘Transparent Pictures,’ Kendall Walton ‘What’s Special About Photography?’ Ted Cohen He also recommends the following book on Hubble imagery: Picturing the Cosmos, Elizabeth A. Kessler Happy reading! Matt Teichman...

Episode 86: Daniel Smyth discusses photographs and their vicissitudes

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we discuss photographs and their vicissitudes with Daniel Smyth, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at the Sage School of Philosophy of Cornell University. (And yes, Smyth used to study and teach at the University of Chicago!) Click here to listen to the episode. In this episode, Smyth asks: What does a photograph evidence?...

Episode 85: Bryce Huebner discusses race and cognitive science

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we discuss race and cognitive science with Bryce Huebner, associate professor of philosophy at Georgetown University. Click here to listen to our conversation. Of course, we as individuals can be racist. Of course, so can our institutions. But when do we realize this, so that we might get something done about it?...

Further Reading on democracy

For those who are interested in following up on democracy and governmental legitimacy, check out the following article by our distinguished guest: ‘Consent and Political Legitimacy,’ Amanda Greene For a deeper dive, Amanda Greene recommends the following: Democratic Legitimacy, Fabienne Peter Democratic Authority: A Philosophical Framework, David Estlund ‘On Legitimacy and Political Deliberation,’ Bernard Manin, Elly Stein and Jane Mansbridge ‘Arguing for Majority Rule,’ Mathias Risse ‘Procedure and Substance in Deliberative Democracy,’ Joshua Cohen (in Deliberative Democracy) ‘Defending the Purely Instrumental Account of Democratic Legitimacy,’ Richard Arneson ‘Democracy: Instrumental vs....

Episode 84: Amanda Greene discusses the legitimacy of democracy

Subscribe to Elucidations:         Last year, we talked about anarchism. This year, we turn to democracy with Amanda Greene, Lecturer in Philosophy at University College, London, and Law and Philosophy Fellow at the University of Chicago. Click here to listen to our discussion. In the West, at least, most of us consider democracy to be the obvious choice for the best form of government, but we rarely take a step back to think about why....

Further Reading on Genealogical Anxiety

Those of you who would like to follow up on our interview with Bob Simpson can check out this article, which was the impetus for a lot of what we talked about: ‘You Just Believe that Because,’ Roger White That one requires a journal subscription, but you can look at Bob’s own paper on this (with Josh DiPaolo) without a journal subscription here: ‘Indoctrination Anxiety and the Etiology of Belief,’Joshua DiPaolo and Robert Mark Simpson...

Episode 83: Bob Simpson discusses genealogical anxiety

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we discuss genealogical anxiety with Bob Simpson, lecturer in philosophy at Monash University. Click here to listen to our conversation. If you listen to this podcast, then for better or worse, you have likely been exposed to some Nietzsche (hopefully at a safe level!). In the nineteenth century, Friedrich Nietzsche (perhaps notoriously) introduced an epistemological sense of genealogy – a genealogy of what we purport to know – by telling a story about how we have come to know the things we purport to know....

Episode 82: Robert May discusses Frege and the problem of identity

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we pull up our chairs and sit down once again with Robert May, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and Linguistics at the University of California, Davis. Click here to listen to our conversation. It seems sublime, unbelievable, groundbreaking – but maybe it actually doesn’t mean anything at all:...

Further reading on Peirce and categories

For background on categories in general, Cathy Legg recommends the following: Amie Thomasson (2013). “Categories”, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Paul Studtmann (2013). “Categories in Aristotle”, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Barry Smith (2003). “Ontology”, in Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information, (Oxford: Blackwell) Manley Thompson (1957). “On Category Differences”, Philosophical Review, 66(4): 486–508. For background on categories as they figure in Peirce’s work, our esteemed guest recommends the following:...

Episode 81: Cathy Legg discusses what Peirce's categories can do for you

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we talk with Catherine Legg, Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at New Zealand’s University of Waikato. She teaches us about the philosophical categories of Charles Sanders Peirce’s (pronounced like the bag “purse”). Click here to listen to our conversation. At Legg’s university, philosophy is part of the School of Social Sciences....

Further reading on love and moral value

Those of you who would like a further taste of Mark Hopwood’s views about valuing a person as a particular can take a look at this short piece: ‘TPA Normativity of Love,’ Mark Hopwood Enjoy! Matt Teichman...

Episode 80: Mark Hopwood discusses love and moral value

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we discuss love and moral value with Mark Hopwood, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Sewanee: The University of the South, and former co-host of this podcast! Click here to listen to our conversation. In discussing rights, religion, politics, and much more, we ask: Who has moral value? Who are we obliged to accommodate, support, even love?...

Episode 79: Thony Gillies discusses conditionals

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we discuss conditionals with Anthony (Thony) Gillies, Professor of Philosophy at Rutgers University. Click here to listen to our conversation. Lately, philosophers have resurrected interest in formal theories of what’s meant by conditional statements, or if-then statements. Conditionals are basic, because they relate conditions – knowns and unknowns, actions and results, etc....

Episode 78: Stephen Engstrom discusses the categorical imperative

Subscribe to Elucidations:         Episode transcript here. This month, we discuss the categorical imperative with Stephen Engstrom, professor of philosophy at the University of Pittsburgh. Click here to listen to our conversation. True to the Chicago tradition, we philosophers spend a lot of time asking – but perhaps not so much time answering – an everyday question: What’s the right thing to do?...

Further reading on reasons

Those of you who are interested in following up on the topic of our previous episode can take a look at the following two papers: Mark Schroeder, “Stakes, Withholding, and Pragmatic Encroachment“ Mark Schroeder, “The Unity of Reasons“ Happy reading! Matt Teichman...

Episode 77: Mark Schroeder discusses reasons for action and belief

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we discuss reasons for action and belief with Mark Schroeder, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Southern California. Click here to listen to our conversation. Consider one question from this episode. Can we decide what to believe, the way we decide how to act? We can, for instance, decide to worship at a church or temple....

Further Reading on Gratitude

Those of you who are interested in picking up some of the threads from our last episode can take a look at the following article: ‘Being Helped and Being Grateful,’ Barbara Herman Happy reading! Matt Teichman...

Episode 76: Barbara Herman discusses gratitude

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we discuss gratitude with Barbara Herman, Griffin Professor of Philosophy and Professor of Law at the University of California, Los Angeles. Click here to listen to our conversation. Is our subject this week, well, gratuitous? Given the dearth of philosophical attention to it in the last century or two, gratitude might not seem worth studying....

Further Reading on non-monotonic logic

For those of you who are interested in following up on Malte Willer’s recommended solution to the miners paradox, he recommends the following paper: ‘Dynamic Thoughts on Ifs and Oughts,’ Malte Willer Happy reading! Matt Teichman...

Episode 75: Malte Willer discusses non-monotonic logic

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we discuss non-monotonic logic with Malte Willer, assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Chicago. Click here to listen to our conversation. If you have been so lucky as to take an introductory logic class, then you will learn a conception of logic that is, well, downright logical....

Episode 74: Christina Van Dyke discusses gender and medieval mysticism

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we discuss gender and medieval mysticism with Christina Van Dyke, professor of philosophy, director of gender studies, and executive director of the Society of Christian Philosophers at Calvin College. Click here to listen to our conversation. How might the notion of God to have meaning to us? God today can increasingly seem to us a mere historical phenomenon–a subject of past peoples’ energy, but presently only a subject of professors’ study....

Episode 73: Greg Salmieri discusses Ayn Rand’s moral philosophy

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we discuss Ayn Rand’s moral philosophy with Greg Salmieri, who teaches at Rutgers University and Stevens Institute of Technology and is co-secretary of the American Philosophical Association’s Ayn Rand Society. Click here to listen to our conversation. But wait: Ayn Rand is most famous for her novels The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged....

Further Reading on pejoratives

Those of you who would like to follow up on the topic of this month’s episode can look at: ‘Moral and Semantic Innocence,’ Christopher Hom and Robert May In that paper, the semantic theory we discussed is presented in a bit more detail. Matt Teichman...

Episode 72: Robert May discusses pejorative expressions

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we discuss pejorative expressions with Robert May, distinguished professor of philosophy and linguistics at University of California, Davis. Click here to listen to our conversation. So pejorative expressions are politically incorrect. We should not, say, call Jews kikes. How should we understand why we should not? May says we should not for the simple reason his mother taught him as a child: “There are no such things as kikes....

Further Reading on Carnap

For those of you who are interested in following up on the topic of this month’s episode, Kent Schmor recommends the following overview article: “Carnap’s Logical Structure of the World,” Christopher Pincock For more background on the Vienna Circle, the philosophical group with whom Carnap was affiliated early in his career, see: “The Vienna Circle,” Thomas Uebel Kent writes: “Strictly speaking, the Circle didn’t go public until 1928, the same year the Aufbau was published....

Episode 71: Kent Schmor discusses Rudolf Carnap's Logische Aufbau

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we discuss Rudolf Carnap’s Aufbau with Kent Schmor, visiting philosophy instructor at the University of Pittsburgh. Click here to listen to our conversation. Why, Carnap would ask, did independent philosophers keep attempting to rehash huge domains? Scientists, Carnap noticed, each work on a focused problem, broadening knowledge collaboratively....

Further reading on Spinoza's ethics

Would you like to follow up on our previous episode? Susan James recommends looking at the following sections from Spinoza’s classic work: Tractatus Theologico-Politicus, Chapter 2 Tractatus Theologico-Politicus, Chapter 3 Tractatus Theologico-Politicus, Chapter 4 If you really want to do a deep dive, she also recommends the following secondary material: Collective Imaginings: Spinoza, Past and Present, eds. Moira Gatens and Genevieve Lloyd Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion, and Politics: The Theologico-Political Treatise, Susan James...

Episode 70: Susan James discusses Spinoza on the good embodied life

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we discuss Benedict de Spinoza’s work on the good embodied life with Susan James, Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck, University of London. Click here to listen to our conversation. Spinoza (1632-1677) was born in what was then one of Europe’s most free Jewish communities, in Holland. Perhaps thanks to that, he developed ideas centuries ahead of his time....

New Blogger: Dominic Surya

Please join me in welcoming Dominic Surya, our new blogger! We are excited to have him with us. Matt Teichman...

Background Reading on Adam Smith

If you’d like to do more reading on the topic of our last epsiode, check out Christel Fricke’s paper, Adam Smith: The Sympathetic Process and The Origin and Function Of Conscience, in the Oxford Handbook of Adam Smith. Matt Teichman...

Episode 69: Christel Fricke discusses Adam Smith's theory of moral sentiment

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we discuss the moral philosophy of Adam Smith with Christel Fricke, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Oslo, and Research Director at the Center for the Study of Mind in Nature in the Department of Philosophy, Classics, and History of Art and Ideas at the University of Oslo....

Further Reading on Anarchism

For those of you who would like to follow up on our previous episode, Mark Lance recommends the following website, which is quite a thorough resource! http://anarchism.pageabode.com/afaq/index.html Matt Teichman...

Episode 68: Mark Lance discusses anarchism

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we talk political philosophy with Mark Lance, Professor of Philosophy and Professor of Justice and Peace at Georgetown University. Click here to listen to our conversation. Anarchy. Sounds like the wild west or something, doesn’t it? Lawlessness indeed sounds pretty terrifying. But our guest argues that anarchism isn’t at all about lawlessness; that anarchists are indeed very much in favor of society being governed....

Further reading on morality, evolution, and disasters

So a good starting point for those of you who are curious to read up on the topic of our last episode would be John Protevi’s own ‘Darwin, Disaster, and War.’ Our distinguished guest also recommends looking at the website for a course he recently taught on the topic: http://www.protevi.com/john/Morality/index.html Happy reading! Matt Teichman...

Episode 67: John Protevi discusses Darwin, disaster, and prosociality

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we chat with John Protevi (Professor of Philosophy and Phyllis M. Taylor Professor of French Studies at Louisiana State University) about whether human beings may have evolved an altruism instinct. Click here to listen to our conversation. Thomas Hobbes famously argued that deep down, we’re all selfish creatures....

Episode 66: Haim Gaifman discusses mathematical reasoning

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we talk recreational mathematics with Haim Gaifman, Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University. Click here to listen to our conversation. Are numbers mind-independent entites, or are they just social constructs? A mountain is definitely real–you can climb it, take pictures of it, fall off it, show it to your friends, and so on....

Episode 65: Julian Savulescu discusses doping in sports

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we consider the role of enhancement in sports with Julian Savulescu, Uehiro Professor of Practical Ethics at the University of Oxford. Click here to listen to our conversation. These days, we take it for granted that taking drugs to enhance athletic performance is wrong. After all, it’s cheating: the rules of all professional sports place strict limits on which drugs their athletes are allowed to use, and for good reason....

Further reading on the analytic tradition

Those of you who would like to follow up on our latest episode, look no further! Here are the introduction and afterword to the volume we discussed. Matt Teichman...

Episode 64: James Conant and Jay Elliott discuss the analytic tradition

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we talk analytic philosophy with James Conant (Chester D. Tripp Professor of Humanities and Philosophy at the University of Chicago) and Jay Elliott (Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Classical Studies at Bard College). Click here to listen our conversation. A lot of us learned a certain story about what analytic philosophy is when we were in college....

Further reading on reference

If you’d like to read up on some of the topics from our previous episode, Michael Devitt recommends the following book: Language and Reality, Kim Sterelny & Michael Devitt Alternatively, if you don’t have access to a library or a bookstore, you can look at the following survey article: “Reference,” Marga Reimer Matt Teichman...

Episode 63: Michael Devitt discusses reference

Subscribe to Elucidations:         Joining us this month to talk about a foundational topic in the philosophy of language is Michael Devitt, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the City University of New York, Graduate Center. Click here to listen to our conversation with him. Some animals make noises to express emotions they’re having. But other animals–notably, we humans–make utterances that do more....

Further reading on Hegel and Kant

If you’d like to read more about Hegel’s repsonse to Kantian ethics, you might take a look at the following two books by our distinguished guest: Sally Sedgwick, Hegel’s Critique of Kant Sally Sedgwick, Kant’s Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals: An Introduction Matt Teichman...

Rule-Following, Dispositionalism, and Functionalism

In “Kripke and Functionalism” (Episode 61), Buechner describes how Kripke’s criticism of the dispositionalist response to the ‘rule-following paradox,’ found in Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations,can be generalized as a criticism of functionalist accounts of mental states, the thesis that mental states are abstract computational states realized in physical objects, like a brain. Here, I’d like to give a sketch of the rule-following paradox, the dispositionalist response, and Kripke’s criticism in Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language, in order to give you a clearer idea of the criticism of functionalism Buechner points to....

Episode 62: Sally Sedgwick discusses Hegel's critique of Kant

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we talk to Sally Sedgwick Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and Affiliated Professor of Germanic Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago) about Hegel’s critique of Kantian ethics. Click here to listen to our conversation. Over 200 years after Immanuel Kant published his work on ethics, it still represents one of the most influential perspectives in the field....

Episode 61: Jeff Buechner discusses Kripke and functionalism

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we talk computers, brains, and minds with Jeff Buechner, Permanent Lecturer in Philosophy at Rutgers University, Newark. Click here to listen to our conversation. Back in the 50s and 60s, a lot of philosophers were attracted to the idea that the human mind is basically a computer. Why would they find that idea attractive?...

Further reading on oughts

If you’re interested in learning more about our distinguished guest’s proposed analysis of ‘ought,’ check out the following two papers: Fabrizio Cariani, ‘Epistemic and Deontic Should‘ Fabrizio Cariani, ‘Deontic Modals and Probabilities: One Theory to Rule Them All?‘ Matt Teichman...

On the Probabilistic Problem for A Single-Meaning Account of 'Ought'

A central distinction in “Thoughts About Oughts” (Episode 60) is that between epistemic and deontic uses of ‘ought.’ As a quick review, here’s an example of an epistemic use of ‘ought.’ Imagine that you open the window in the morning, feel a strong breeze and suffocating humidity, and see a massive, dark wall of clouds on the horizon. You declare to your roommate: (Ep) It ought to rain today. And for an example of a deontic use of ought: Imagine that you have a final exam tomorrow, which you need to pass in order to graduate....

Episode 60: Fabrizio Cariani shares some thoughts about oughts

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, Fabrizio Cariani (Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Northwestern University) comes back for his second appearance on the program, this time to tell us about the meaning of the word ‘ought.’ You can listen to our conversation by clicking here. ‘Ought’ is a pretty important word in human affairs....

Further reading on reproductive risk

If you’d like read more about some of the issues we discussed with Rebecca Kukla, take a look at these two articles: ‘Measuring Mothering,’ Rebecca Kukla ‘The ethics and cultural politics of reproductive risk warnings: A case study of California’s Proposition 65,’ Rebecca Kukla Matt Teichman...

Episode 59: Rebecca Kukla discusses reproductive risk

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we talk to Rebecca Kukla, Professor of Philosophy at Georgetown University and Senior Research Scholar at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, about some of her work on reproductive risk. Click here to listen to our conversation. A pregnant woman is usually advised to be cautious about what products to purchase, whether to drink alcohol, and which locations to frequent....

Further reading on vagueness

If you’d like to poke through some of the details of Shapiro’s theory, take a look at this article from a collection called Heaps and Liars: ‘Vagueness and Conversation,’ Stewart Shapiro Matt Teichman...

Episode 58: Stewart Shapiro discusses vagueness (part II)

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we are delighted to make our return to the topic of vagueness, this time in conversation with Stewart Shapiro, Professor of Philosophy at The Ohio State University. Click here to listen to our discussion. You may remember from our previous episode on vagueness that most of the adjectives, common nouns, verbs, and prepositions we use are vague....

Further reading on virtue ethics

If that last episode whetted your appetite for virtue ethics (it certainly whetted mine), Julia Annas recommends the following references: Intelligent Virtue, Julia Annas On Virtue Ethics, Rosalind Hursthouse Virtue Ethics: A Pluralistic View, Christine Swanton A Theory of Virtue, Robert Merrihew Adams Enjoy! Matt Teichman...

Episode 57: Julia Annas discusses virtue ethics

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month we sit down with Julia Annas, Regents Professor of Philosophy at the University of Arizona, to talk about virtue ethics. Click here to listen to our conversation. Today we’re used to thinking of ethics as the study of how to act in certain situations. Given any particular hypothetical scenario, what would be the right thing for you to do?...

Further reading on corporate rights and responsibilities

If you’re interested to learn more about Philip Pettit’s views on corporate rights and responsibilities, take a look at this 2007 paper: Philip Pettit, ‘Responsibility Incorporated‘ Matt Teichman...

Episode 56: Philip Pettit discusses corporate rights and responsibilities

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we sit down with Philip Pettit to discuss some of his work on whether corporations have rights. Click here to listen to our conversation. Much of what goes on in today’s world is the work of corporations, which command far more money and power than any individual person can....

Further reading on paradoxes of consistency

To see Branden Fitelson’s notion of coherence spelled out in full detail, you can read the following two papers: Branden Fitelson and Kenny Easwaran, “Accuracy, Coherence, and Evidence.” Branden Fitelson, Rachel Briggs, Fabrizio Cariani, and Kenny Easwaran, “Individual Coherence and Group Coherence.” For an interesting extension of that framework to cover cases where a person suspends judgment, you can take a look at: Kenny Easwaran, “Dr. Truthlove: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Bayesian Probabilities....

Episode 55: Branden Fitelson discusses paradoxes of consistency

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month we are delighted to have Branden Fitelson back for his second appearance on the program. The topic was some recent work he has been doing with Rachel Briggs, Fabrizio Cariani, and Kenny Easwaran on paradoxes of consistency. Click here to listen to our conversation. Imagine you’re a scientist, and you publish a huge book presenting the results of your research over the past decade....

Further reading on Frege and logicism

Interested in following up on our discussion with Patricia Blanchette? Take a look at the following material on the debate between Gottlob Frege and David Hilbert: ‘The Frege-Hilbert Controversy,’ Patricia Blanchette ‘Frege and Hilbert on Consistency,’ Patricia Blanchette If you’re curious to take a look at what Frege wrote about the logicist project, his Foundations of Arithmetic is a wonderful read and readily accessible to those without a background in mathematics: Foundations of Arithmetic, Gottlob Frege Happy reading!...

Episode 54: Patricia Blanchette discusses Frege's logicism

Subscribe to Elucidations:         Full transcript here. This month, we sit down with Patricia Blanchette to discuss the work of Gottlob Frege, one of the most influential philosophers of the 20th century. Click here to listen to our conversation. We saw in our episode on the philosophy of mathematics how difficult it was to say what numbers are....

Further reading on Wittgenstein and formal semantics

For those of you interested in following up on our previous episode, Martin Stokhof has a number of papers on the topics we discussed. On Wittgenstein and formal semantics, you can check out: ‘The Architecture of Meaning: Wittgenstein’s Tractatus and Formal Semantics,’ Martin Stokhof ‘Formal Semantics and Wittgenstein: An Alternative,’ Martin Stokhof On the distinction between abstraction and idealization, see: ‘Abstractions and Idealisations: The Construction of Modern Linguistics,’ Martin Stokhof & Michiel van Lambalgen...

Episode 53: Martin Stokhof discusses formal semantics and Wittgenstein

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we talk semantics with Martin Stokhof, Professor of Philosophy of Language at the Institute for Logic, Language, and Computation in Amsterdam. Click here to listen to our conversation. Formal semanticists are in the business of spelling out the rules by which the meaning of a sentence in English (or French, or Spanish, or some other human language) are derived from the words in it and the way they’re put together....

Elucidations is now on Twitter!

Check out our new Twitter feed at @ElucidationsPod. We’d love to hear your comments/thoughts/suggestions....

Episode 52: Rafeeq Hasan discusses Rousseau on freedom and happiness

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we talk political philosophy with Rafeeq Hasan, Harper-Schmidt Fellow and Collegiate Assistant Professor in the Division of the Humanities at the University of Chicago. Click here to listen to our conversation. In today’s political discussions, we tend to assume that there are two ways a person can lean....

Conditional Questions: A Problem for a 'Classical' Semantic Approach

In Elucidations Episode 51, Groenendijk and Roelofsen sketch out some of the merits of the inquisitive semantics approach to questions in contrast to the ‘classical’ semantic approach. One stark area of contrast is with respect to conditional questions—questions like: “If Matt drinks coffee, does Phil drink coffee?” Groenedijk and Roelofsen observe that the classic semantic approach to questions cannot easily accommodate these conditional questions. In this post, I’d like to flesh out this observation just a bit more....

Inquisitive Semantics Website

There really is a lot of exciting work being done right now using the framework of inquisitive semantics. If you’d like to browse through it all, a great place to start is the inquisitive semantics website. Matt Teichman...

Background reading on inquisitive semantics

If you’d like to take a look how the inquisitive semantic framework is set up, this is an up-to-date overview: Ciardelli, Groenendijk, and Roelofsen, ‘Inquisitive Semantics: a New Notion of Meaning‘ And if you’d like to examine the framework in a little more detail, this paper will probably answer all of your burning questions: Ciardelli, Groenendijk, and Roelofsen, ‘Inquisitive Semantics: NASSLI 2012 Lecture Notes‘ Matt Teichman...

Episode 51: Jeroen Groenendijk and Floris Roelofsen discuss inquisitive semantics

Subscribe to Elucidations:         This month, we get a little bit meta and ask our distinguished guests some questions about questions. Or at least about the semantics of questions. Jeroen Groenendijk is Professor of Philosophy of Language and Floris Roelofsen is Assistant Professor of Logic and Semantics at the Institute for Logic, Language, and Computation in Amsterdam....

How to save the value of productive work

Toward the end of his interview on Elucidations, Greg Salmieri [S.] argues against Aristotle’s view that some of our life-activities are intrinsically valuable apart from the whole they constitute, in order to make room for valuing productive work alongside the candidates Aristotle himself prefers. This raises a question about Aristotle and a worry about S.’s own view. The question is this: what was Aristotle’s criterion for distinguishing the intrinsically valuable activities from the rest?...